Feature Archive

  • In Motion Archive

    Intrigued by Apple’s patent on finger motions– claiming rights on muscle memory, the tangibility of pinching through physical representations of time enables us to interact directly...

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  • Portfolios Archive

    When I was seven years old, my mother dropped my brother and I off at a movie theater on a summer afternoon to see "The Amazing Colossal Man", one of many cheaply made science fiction movies...

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  • Archive, In Motion Archive

    Ulu Braun’s Atlantic Garden (2010) is a video collage depicting a slow, rotational pan around the center of the grounds of an unidentified coastal mansion. It is composed...

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  • Archive, Before Digital Archive

    Amongst the burgeoning creativity in Paris of the nineteen-twenties, the artist Man Ray, born Emmanuel Radnitzky,expanded the horizons of photography well beyond its representational means, and through relentless darkroom experimentation, liberated that medium from its place as a mirror to nature. His chosen name would come to reflect that mysterious and intrepid realm his photographs occupied in Modern Art. If the famed British inventor Henry Fox Talbot was to...

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  • Archive, Interview Archive

    The Background Noise work arose entirely out of chance and accident. I was scanning a negative, and somewhere along the way the file corrupted. The resulting image exhibited traces of its source, but was largely ruptured, an example of the kind of schism that permeates the digitization process. I was drawn to the mishap from an aesthetic standpoint, but even more so it underpinned an anxiety that I felt...

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  • Interview Archive

    On March 21st, 2014, the collaborative duo Nate Larson and Marni Shindleman took to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat to answer questions by In the In-Between writer Luke Shaw. This conversation began with the question: How can human intimacy can be attained through digitally mediated dialogue?

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  • Portfolios Archive

    I exploit magazines because I like to respond to what I see every day, I don't accept the found reality. In my work I want to transfer the found photographs by very simple means into a new aesthetic context. I want to revitalize the found photographs. Like in a centrifuge I try to dissect, filter and distil the images since I can create really new identities and creatures, so that the new faces and bodies exert their effect at first sight. Similar to a modern DJ who samples different tracks...

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  • A Closer Look Archive

    There was a moment at the turn of the century at which digital imaging technologies matured, at which the aesthetics of photo-realism ascended beyond the digital kitsch experiments of the previous decade. The mastery of digital tools spurred a re-evaluation of and insight into the photographic canon, and pictorial genres of the past began to...

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  • Interview Archive

    Humor, subversiveness, and satire are all words that come to mind when viewing the F series' by Spanish artist José Camara. Within the found photographs, family pictures, and images...

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  • In Motion Archive

    For the last few years I’ve been using “installation view” photographs as sources for works examining our online encounter with art set in physical spaces. As someone who lives away from major art cities and centers, I’m drawn to the material and conceptual conditions that surround the careful composition, presentation...

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  • Portfolios Archive

    At some point it began to matter to me how I thought about Robert Frank's The Americans. To be sure, the book had for some time served as a reference for me, a kind of Strunk & White for photography...

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  • Interview Archive

    With so much chatter lately about the use of surveillance technologies in photography today, and with one critic even referring to it as an emergent genre of image-making, Andrew Hammerand's series The New Town both acknowledges...

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  • Interview Archive

    The various series' presented here by Christopher Meerdo largely reflect a counterpoint to the use of digital imaging technology to strive for the perfect and flawless picture. In his projects Anthologies and...

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  • Portfolios Archive

    Through the Go ogle series I seek to examine the visual experience of the internet, proposing a visual means of exploring encounters with the increasingly ubiquitous screen-based landscapes through which we routinely meander. Although these...

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  • Interview Archive

    The images of architectural structures in Adam Ryder's Selections from the Joint Photographic Survey function as relics from a rediscovered archive of a geological and cultural survey of the Holy Land. Ryder presents these pictures as selections from an ambitious FSA-like project between two factions who occupied lands that exist now as Israel, Palestine, and Jordan...

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  • Before Digital Archive

    Burgess Franklin Collins, born August 6, 1923, began his adult life showing a great deal of promise in the sciences. He majored in Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, and in 1943 was drafted..

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  • Portfolios Archive

    When examining our daily contemporary lives in western culture, one finds that there is barely a single situation that is not influenced by digital technology and communication through the World Wide Web...

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  • Interview Archive

    Through the arbitrary charting and graphing of visual data, Brooklyn-based artist Mark Dorf offers a poignant metaphor for the control we impose upon the physical world. His series Axiom & Simulation...

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  • In Motion Archive

    This project investigates the idea of using computation to “use up” a piece of technology, in this case a digital camera. Using custom-written software (and a very long period of time), every possible photograph...

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  • Interview Archive

    Through the use of science fiction and fantasy imagery, New York artist Mary Mattingly addresses real world problems of environmental sustainability. Throughout her various photographic series, which supplement her sculptural...

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  • Interview Archive

    Although experimentation with the accurate depiction of reality is nothing new to the field of photography, Dutch artist Reinier Gerritsen and the seductively...

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  • A Closer Look Archive

    Nancy Davenport's stirring photo series Apartments explores the parallels between violence sponsored by the state and violence inflicted by individual actors, the unique tension between reality and its recollection in media...

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  • In Motion Archive

    Professional sporting events are places of intense spectacle. Athletes rise to celebrity status as they execute stunning displays of skill to the explosive adulation of audiences waiting in anticipation...

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  • Interview Archive

    In his series, Atomic Overlook, L.A. artist Clay Lipski opens an engaging dialog about public fascination with the nuclear bomb. Appropriating imagery of both mushroom clouds and tourist figures, Lipsky combines them aptly to create an unsettling casual set of pictures in which the austerity and violence of the atomic explosion...

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  • Interview Archive

    Through an intertwining of domestic imagery and the female form, Swedish-born artist Eva Stenram offers challenges to her viewers on multiple fronts. The literal veiling of her figures, borrowed from 60s era pin-up images, offers a direct comment on antiquated domestic gender roles, leaving to the imagination how...

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  • Interview Archive

    The grandiose cyber-scapes of California artist Carolyn Janssen colorize a new approach to the sublime...

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  • Before Digital Archive

    Henry Peach Robinson's earliest endeavors at art were highly precocious oil paintings, one of which was accepted into a prestigious gallery showing while Robinson was only 22. Although he was already fully prepared for...

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  • Interview Archive

    Chicago Artist Jayson Bimber's digital collages are comical in their approach to notions of the sacrosanct in both religion and art. His two interrelated series', Masterpieces and Good is Dead recreate Modern Art masterpieces as well as stories from the Old Testament through the process of collaging material from pornographic and popular magazines. The resulting images search for an exchange between popular art, religion, and pornography...

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  • Interview Archive

    American Artist Peter Leighton's images transform the mundane scenes of Ecuadorian street life into mystical meditations on notions of the indigenous- both cultural and photographic...

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  • In Motion Archive

    Optional Features Shown is comprised of portions of car commercials in which the text and representations of cars and people have been digitally replaced...

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  • Interview Archive

    Brooklyn-based photographer Zach Nader prods the possibilities of image-language and perception. As his Counterweight series explores family photographs through digital interventions and obfuscated subject matter...

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  • Interview Archive

    Kalee Appleton's Bit Rot series explores the properties of digital information through the guise of landscape pictures. By manipulating the information embedded in the image file, rather than...

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  • Interview Archive

    Hungarian photographer Adam Magyar presents us with fictional top-down views of the urban environment in his project, Squares. These images, constructed of hundreds of different pictures using custom-built photographic...

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  • Before Digital Archive

    Hannah Hoch (born Anna Therese Johanne Hoch on November 1, 1899) remains a well-known member of the Berlin Dada movement, and was among the first prominent artists to work with photo-montage techniques. Hoch attended the College of Arts and Crafts in Berlin from 1912 to 1914, during the tense lead-up to the first World War.

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  • Interview Archive

    Danish Photographer Peter Funch took to the streets of New York in 2006 to capture life in the city...

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  • Interview Archive

    Italian Surrealist Franco Donaggio follows in a long line of artists who've investigated the world of dreams. The two projects featured here, Morpheus' Spaces and Urbis, take two distinct approaches to surrealism in relation to the urban environment....

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  • Before Digital Archive

    Martin helped to pioneer the technique of photo-montage in America. His postcards depicted humorously hyperbolic scenes from...

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  • Interview Archive

    Kelli Connell's body of work, Double Life, is now in its twelfth year. During this time we've seen the unfolding of an intimate and complex dynamic of a woman's relationship; defined perhaps as a self-portrait acted out by another...

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  • A Closer Look Archive

    "If it were women who ran the world," an old saying begins, and artist Debbie Grossman has attempted to finish that platitude for us in her series My Pie Town. In 1940, Russell Lee created a series of photographs in a small community...

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  • In Motion Archive

    Leigh Merrill constructs imaginary spaces using thousands of photographs and video segments to create oddly hypnotic and meditative scenes of...

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  • Interview Archive

    With her impressionist views of popular cultural landmarks, Corinne Vionnet presents a collective vision of the Tourist. These images from her series, Photo Opportunities, are composed of hundreds of snapshots found on the web, and are carefully combined to represent communal ideas of well-known tourist destinations.

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  • Before Digital Archive

    Yves Klein (1928 - 1962) is considered to be one of the most noteworthy artists to emerge in the mid-20th century. He was one of the founding members of a brief but distinct art movement called Nouveau réalisme (New Realism) which sought to distinguish itself from abstract painting by returning to "reality" in its subject matter via direct appropriation of images or materials...

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  • A Closer Look Archive

    At once classically familiar and eerily chimerical, Julie Blackmon’s work draws the viewer into the everyday world of a typical suburban family with skillful metaphor and touching sincerity. Her recognition of...

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  • Before Digital Archive

    Oscar Rejlander could be considered one of the pioneers of art photography, and was among the first to employ a technique...

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  • Interview Archive

         The reconstructed images of Leigh Merrill mirror the way in which architectural styles are often blended within cultural...

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  • Interview Archive

    The work of Matthew Swarts can be described as pictures brought back from the dead. As an artist of appropriation, he re-conditions found images through both digital and printing processes. Writing this interview let me to spend a long time thinking about the meaning of images whose intentions have long since been forgotten, and in a sense I’m intrigued by Swarts’ interest in recycling these types of pictures. In the act of re-purposing, he breaths into these images new life and new meaning.

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  • Interview Archive

    Quebec born artist Aislinn Leggett creates composite narratives of the Canadian landscape. With a mixture of family photography and found images, Leggett crafts imagery that reverberates with the history of the Canadian landscape

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  • A Closer Look Archive

    British Artist Helen Sear’s dual series, Inside the View and Beyond the View, expresses variations on themes of female strength, passivity and defiance. Through the use of super-impositions and digital drawing, she presents to us anonymous portraits of women layered under foils of flower motifs, intimate landscapes...

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  • A Closer Look Archive

    Brett Seamans and Lucy "Pony" Lott are a fashion duo based out of the Lower East Side in New York City. Their work ranges from gritty experimental film work to CGI, animation and graphic illustration. These two, just barely out of school, have already begun to make a name for themselves as artists working on the cutting edge fashion-based imaging.

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  • Interview Archive

    In Josh Poehlein ’s series, Modern History, we see both re-enactments and fabrications of historical events made by compositing together imagery from YouTube videos. His scenes raise many ideas about history, mythologism, and the vast amount of digital data we...

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  • Interview Archive

    Asger Carlsen ’s documentary-like images create an uncanny vision of the grotesque. What I find interesting about them is the sculptural quality lent to his subjects, as well as the sparse and un-kept environments they’re photographed in. The tension between his realist style of his photographs and their un-real subject matter creates a seamless platform from which we can ruminate over our own physical mortality.

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  • Interview Archive

    Armed with an iphone and an imagination, Karen Divine creates surrealistic scenes crafted through photographs and illustration. She brings to life a world of color, symbolism, and imagination that are often reflections of her own personal experiences.

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  • Interview Archive

    What strikes me most about Jackson Patterson's images is his method of creating narrative by presenting two disparate pictures as a single image. Each of his images display a duality of visual and cerebral dimensions...

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  • In Motion Archive

    Xanadu critiques popular representations of the increasingly virtual ‘ideal city’; here conceived as a trans-cultural model of contemporary utopia...

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  • Interview Archive

    I came across Johan’s work back in March, and decided to interview him long before In the In-Between was off the ground. His series, Off, goes straight to the heart of digital theory and I felt it was a perfect example to set the foundations of what In-B is all about. So without further ado…

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  • Archive

    "Working with this material is a bit like an archeological dig, a slow shift that mirrors my own waking up. It’s partly nostalgia, mixed with a twist of horror. I want to trace that shift in how we were depicted, what messages were encoded...

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