Conversations

David Campany is among the most prolific and well-respected photography writers and curators working today. He has contributed historical and critical analysis of photographs in over two-hundred published essays for high-profile monographs and museum exhibitions, curates exhibitions for major museums and festivals…

In Foglia’s work, the environment is not just a setting for a story to take place – a field of characterizing details – but an essential subject of the story itself in the photographer’s quest to reveal the complicated relationship we have with a natural world. Lucas was kind enough to answer some questions about his practice.

Everything is Collective is a trio of artists, Aaron Hegert, Zachary Norman, and Jason Lukas, who together create collaborative images, books, and exhibitions. The pillar of their practice is an ongoing self-published book series, Deliberate Operations, which presents collections of images that are ping-ponged back and forth between the three to create shared theoretical and visual responses to a range of issues within the context of digital experience.

Barry W. Hughes’ NEOP series has been ongoing since 2013 and represents an open-ended exploration of photography’s capacity to register our scientific and cultural relationship to outer space. The varying visual strategies that make up Hughes’ ongoing collection of photographs utilize staged fictions, still life constructions, and facsimiles as stand-ins for…

For nearly five years, Peruvian-born, Seattle-based artist Rafael Soldi has transformed loss and uncertainty into a profound, sometimes abstract photography series Life Stand Still Here. It branched from an earlier project based on a sudden breakup and evolved into a murky succession of images that connect Soldi’s deeply personal moments with grander, more universal struggles. Using a range of techniques including still life, abstraction, and a large-scale grid of photobooth portraits, Soldi asks viewers to consider the connection between his experiences and their own. 

I first encountered Paul Mpagi Sepuya’s work when I walked into his 2017 solo exhibition at Yancey Richardson Gallery in New York City.  I didn’t so much view his pictures as I did stare at them, trying to reconcile the spatial constructions, to untangle the delicate knots of reference and self-reference, seeking to decode anonymous flesh of male forms, and trying to figure out where any given picture starts or ends;