Conversations

Cloaked in a rhetoric of commercial promise, Joseph Desler Costa’s pictures appear, with glossy sheen, fresh off an assembly line. At first glance they present a seemingly impenetrable surface of salesmanship, a mere costuming over the artist’s searching through his own memory for products of promise that have shaped his upbringing. Costa finds an inseparable link between aesthetics and desire, allowing his own pictures to succumb to that aesthetics as a means to reveal the inner workings of them. In his pictures, consumer staples like Nike shoes and McDonald’s fries are mixed with sparse fragments of recreated memories rendered with foggy vagueness. What Costa produces is a masquerade of a masquerade, subverting the idealist promise of commerce and blending memory and desire into hypnotic echo of an echo of the real. What things may satisfy us? What convinces us of their satisfying qualities? How do pictures sell things, or inversely, how can a picture help but not be an advertisement for itself? And what of our own desire really belongs to us, and what has been implanted via the stealthy pointy end of a well made picture?

Joe Rudko’s work is anything but predictable, yet he calls upon familiar visual spaces in ways that offer a sense of stability. His capacity to find practical and emotional value in the process of art-making keeps him invested in finding novel ways to articulate his ideas.

David Campany is among the most prolific and well-respected photography writers and curators working today. He has contributed historical and critical analysis of photographs in over two-hundred published essays for high-profile monographs and museum exhibitions, curates exhibitions for major museums and festivals…

In Foglia’s work, the environment is not just a setting for a story to take place – a field of characterizing details – but an essential subject of the story itself in the photographer’s quest to reveal the complicated relationship we have with a natural world. Lucas was kind enough to answer some questions about his practice.

Everything is Collective is a trio of artists, Aaron Hegert, Zachary Norman, and Jason Lukas, who together create collaborative images, books, and exhibitions. The pillar of their practice is an ongoing self-published book series, Deliberate Operations, which presents collections of images that are ping-ponged back and forth between the three to create shared theoretical and visual responses to a range of issues within the context of digital experience.

Barry W. Hughes’ NEOP series has been ongoing since 2013 and represents an open-ended exploration of photography’s capacity to register our scientific and cultural relationship to outer space. The varying visual strategies that make up Hughes’ ongoing collection of photographs utilize staged fictions, still life constructions, and facsimiles as stand-ins for…