Conversations

Kelli Connell’s body of work, Double Life, is now in its twelfth year. During this time we’ve seen the unfolding of an intimate and complex dynamic of a woman’s relationship; defined perhaps as a self-portrait acted out by another…

With her impressionist views of popular cultural landmarks, Corinne Vionnet presents a collective vision of the Tourist. These images from her series, Photo Opportunities, are composed of hundreds of snapshots found on the web, and are carefully combined to represent communal ideas of well-known tourist destinations.

The work of Matthew Swarts can be described as pictures brought back from the dead. As an artist of appropriation, he re-conditions found images through both digital and printing processes. Writing this interview let me to spend a long time thinking about the meaning of images whose intentions have long since been forgotten, and in a sense I’m intrigued by Swarts’ interest in recycling these types of pictures. In the act of re-purposing, he breaths into these images new life and new meaning.

Quebec born artist Aislinn Leggett creates composite narratives of the Canadian landscape. With a mixture of family photography and found images, Leggett crafts imagery that reverberates with the history of the Canadian landscape

In Josh Poehlein ’s series, Modern History, we see both re-enactments and fabrications of historical events made by compositing together imagery from YouTube videos. His scenes raise many ideas about history, mythologism, and the vast amount of digital data we…

Asger Carlsen ’s documentary-like images create an uncanny vision of the grotesque. What I find interesting about them is the sculptural quality lent to his subjects, as well as the sparse and un-kept environments they’re photographed in. The tension between his realist style of his photographs and their un-real subject matter creates a seamless platform from which we can ruminate over our own physical mortality.

Armed with an iphone and an imagination, Karen Divine creates surrealistic scenes crafted through photographs and illustration. She brings to life a world of color, symbolism, and imagination that are often reflections of her own personal experiences.

What strikes me most about Jackson Patterson’s images is his method of creating narrative by presenting two disparate pictures as a single image. Each of his images display a duality of visual and cerebral dimensions…

I came across Johan’s work back in March, and decided to interview him long before In the In-Between was off the ground. His series, Off, goes straight to the heart of digital theory and I felt it was a perfect example to set the foundations of what In-B is all about. So without further ado…

“Working with this material is a bit like an archeological dig, a slow shift that mirrors my own waking up. It’s partly nostalgia, mixed with a twist of horror. I want to trace that shift in how we were depicted, what messages were encoded…